William Eggleston @ Foam

William Eggleston, Memphis, 1965 – 1968, from the series Los Alamos, 1965–1974
© Eggleston Artistic Trust / Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London

William Eggleston – Los Alamos
17 March – 7 June 2017

Los Alamos starts in Eggleston’s home town of Memphis and the Mississippi Delta and continues to follow his wanderings through New Orleans, Las Vegas and south California, ending at Santa Monica Pier. During a road trip with writer and curator William Hopps, Eggleston also passed through Los Alamos, the place in New Mexico where the nuclear bomb was developed in secret and to which the series owes its name.

Foam
Keizersgracht 609
1017 DS Amsterdam

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Book Review: Based on a False Story by Al Brydon

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What was old is new again – A conversation with the past

A drawer with rolls of exposed film sat quietly for years. Every once in awhile, Al Brydon would nose about in that drawer, then shut it and forget about them again. But one day he didn’t shut the drawer. “I couldn’t tell you why”, Brydon recalls. “When it’s time it’s time, I guess. The rolls of film suddenly became a way of having a conversation with my past self. I just needed fifteen or so years to realise it. Who wouldn’t want to get into a time machine?”

Brydon took on the chance of obliterating the images taken years before. The fruitful happenstance results of re-exposing those rolls of film were well worth the risk.  While the number of chances for good double exposures was very high, taken amongst roughly between 500 and 600 frames, Brydon states, “The hit rate for usable images was low. There’s only so much serendipity one person can muster it seems.”

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The images in Based on a False Story are a wonderful mix of beautiful double-exposed portraits of old friends and new, juxtaposed landscapes, and tactile images of balanced geometric shapes and forms that construct dreamlike scenes with silhouetted human forms in the distance, or trees forming a horizon line within the portrait of a young man. The images draw in the viewer and evoke a sense of recalling past places and people affected by the passage of time. ‘False Story’ is Brydon’s second book published through Another Place Press this year, and rounds out a full year of marvelous publications from this small-but-mighty publisher.

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Brydon has worked with double exposed film in other projects, including a project with California based photographer J.M Golding. Brydon and Golding swapped rolls of film each other had shot in their respective haunts, and the resulting project, “Tales from a non-existent land”, have a strong influence for this new project. Both projects may be born from a specific type of photographic technique, but both also transcend and speak of something more than the photographic process itself. Brydon has taken it even further by addressing the landscape of the physical and metaphysical worlds.

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Brydon has described his process of working on his landscape work through the analogy of listening; “The dead sing songs, and I am trying to learn how to hear them.” With consideration to all the occurrences man has taken to alter the physical landscape surrounding him, Brydon listens and tries to interpret the history of the land, both past and present. In this way, ‘False Story’ is also a process of connecting one’s past and present. This applies to the personal as well as the physical. Brydon says, “Some of the last photographs I had of one of my best friends were hidden in the rolls somewhere and I was worried about losing them. As it turned out, one of these particular photographs became the most successful in terms of delivering exactly what I was trying to convey. But I had no idea what was on the films really. It was more about a feeling than any compositional considerations. I tried to imagine the younger Al and I walking together while I was making the photographs. What would we have talked about? Would we have even liked each other? We are two extremely different people after all. I just walked and went to places that felt right. There were no rules and no deadlines. I was in the enviable position of freedom within the confines of a two dimensional medium and a limited number of rolls of film.”

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When I asked if ‘False Story’ feels like departure from the majority of the landscape work he has been creating, Brydon said, “Maybe a slight departure… I’d like to say everything I do is well thought out and totally intentional, but this is a falsehood. I make the work, then work out why as I go along. In this instance the process did inform the end result. I was aware there would be some photographs on there I would have liked to see without the addition of another frame over the top. There’s a sadness to the work, but it’s necessary, and as it should be. But the world happens to be immensely beautiful, and I hope I’ve at least conveyed some of that beauty in the photographs.”

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From all the various types of films stored in that drawer, Brydon had to impose some order for the purpose of the project. “Because I was working with different films and due to the chaotic nature of the work I wanted a uniform aesthetic. They were scanned and converted to mono with slight adjustments here and there. I also added the scratches but this was done by literally kicking the negatives around in my cellar. The act of re-exposing the negs was a destructive one and I wanted to continue that destructive process after I’d got the processed films back from the lab. I knew once the films had been processed and the work finished that effectively it would be the end of the conversation. I’m not sure about the long term effects of the work yet. I’m interested to see how I feel about the photographs in a year or so.  I did however keep one film back. This will be re-exposed in another fifteen years so I can have one more stern chat with myself.  I will be 55 years old.”

This psychological evaluation of one’s current self against one’s past self reveals what we know to be true – we are not who we once were. By examining our past self, we change not only who we were, but who we are now. Through the process of creating ‘False Story’, Brydon’s conversation with his past self and destruction of his original images has actually revealed glimpses of his present self. We can only assume that his current work will foretell the work to be created in 15 more years – when he will re-discover who he is, and was, anew.

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Based on a False Story by Al Brydon
© 2016 – published by Another Place Press
http://anotherplacepress.bigcartel.com/
52 pp / 210 x 150mm
Perfect Bound
Fedrigoni & GF Smith papers:
350gsm Colorplan cover, 170gsm Uncoated text
ISBN 978-0-9935688-8-6


Al Brydon is a photographer based in the North of the UK. He is less tall than he seems on the internet. To see more work and projects, visit his website: http://www.al-brydon.com/

Another Place Press is a small independent publisher interested in contemporary photography that explores landscape in the widest sense, covering themes which include land, place, journey, city and environment – from the remotest corners of the globe to the centre of the largest cities. Iain Sarjeant is the founder and editor of Another Place, and Another Place Press.

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Barbara Ciurej & Lindsay Lochman @ Center for Fine Art Photography


Barbara Ciurej & Lindsay Lochman Processed Views: Suryeing the Industrial Landscape
January 13 – March 4, 2017

Artist Talks: February 17, from 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Free Admission
Reception: February 17, from 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Free Admission

“Processed Views interprets the frontier of industrial food production: the seductive and alarming intersection of nature and technology. As we move further away from the sources of our food, we head into uncharted territory replete with unintended consequences for the environment and for our health.
In our commentary on the landscape of processed foods, we reference the work of photographer, Carleton Watkins (1829-1916). His sublime views framed the American West as a land of endless possibilities and significantly influenced the creation of the first national parks. However, many of Watkins’ photographs were commissioned by the corporate interests of the day; the railroad, mining, lumber and milling companies. His commissions served as both documentation of and advertisement for the American West. Watkins’ images upheld the popular 19th century notion of Manifest Destiny – America’s bountiful land, inevitably and justifiably utilized by its citizens.
We built these views to examine consumption, progress and the changing landscape.”

Center for Fine Art Photography
400 North College Avenue | Fort Collins, CO 80524 | 970.224.1010

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Andrea M. Gordon @ fotofoto gallery


Andrea M. Gordon: A Chasm in Time
February 1 – 25, 2017

Reception for the Artist • Saturday, February 4 • 5-7 pm

fotofoto gallery
14 West Carver Street, Huntington, NY
Huntington, NY 11743

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Sadie Barnette @ Baxter St at CCNY

Untitled (Dad, 1968), 2016

Sadie Barnette: Do Not Destroy
January 18 – February 18, 2017

Opening Reception: Wednesday, January 18 , 2016 | 6 – 8pm

The show features new works using as primary source material the 500-page FBI surveillance file on Barnette’s father, Rodney Barnette, who founded the Compton, California, chapter of the Black Panther Party in 1968. The multi-media works embody an intergenerational father-daughter conversation, uniting the personal and the political.

Baxter St at CCNY
126 Baxter Street, New York, NY 10013

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Picturing Love: Photography’s Pursuit of Intimacy @ Katonah Museum of Art

Goldin, Nan

Picturing Love: Photography’s Pursuit of Intimacy
March 19 to June 25, 2017

OPENING RECEPTION: Saturday, March 18

Inspired by Nan Goldin’s The Hug (1980) and divided into sections that represent kissing, holding, mothering, among other themes, Picturing Love includes works by renowned artists as well as lesser known and anonymous authors; indeed the snapshot era of the early twentieth century produced some of the most indelible images in the exhibition. Scenes of coupling are complemented by mother-child pictures made in the late nineteenth century, when subjects were frozen in place for prolonged exposures that added a formality to even the closest of familial relationships. The majority of the works in the exhibition foreground constructs of intimacy within the confines of domestic and personal space. Questioning the dynamic and orientation of the observer to the observed, the works stage a multiplicity of desire—performed by the photographer, the photographed, and the viewer. Featured artists include Tracey Baran, Brassai, Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst, Hashem el Madani, Nan Goldin, Laura Letinsky, Richard Renaldi, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, and James Van Der Zee.

Katonah Museum of Art
134 Jay Street, Katonah, NY 10536.

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Duane Michals’ Talking Pictures


Duane Michals’ Talking Pictures
Saturday, February 18, 2017, 7:00 pm

Join Silver Eye and Point Park University as we host artist Duane Michals for an evening of his own short films and an artist talk. Michals will showcase his new body of work, Talking Pictures, which consists of a dozen short films that were written, directed, and at times acted in by the artist.

RSVP
Seating for this event is limited!
https://silvereye.org/event-calendar/duane-michals-talking-pictures/

Free for Silver Eye members and Point Park University students/staff
$15 for General Admission

Point Park University, GRW Theater, University Center
414 Wood Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15222

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Yan Preston @ Impressions Gallery

40: 3,900km from the river source

Yan Preston: Mother River
31 March to 24 June 2016

The epic project follows a simple premise: to document the 6,211km route of the river from source to delta, using a strict Y Points System to photograph every 100 kilometres. Made over a period of four years, Yan Wang Preston travelled to the remote high Tibetan Plateau through the Three Gorges to the river’s end at Shanghai. She had to find and photograph sixty-three locations in incredibly diverse and often remote terrain. Since the river source is 5,400 metres above sea level, and half of its length flows through some of the most majestic mountains on the Earth, Mother River is on one level a modern-day adventure, where the photographer faced hazards from altitude sickness to mudslides.

Impressions Gallery, Centenary Square, Bradford, BD1 1SD
01274 737843

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Stéphanie Solinas @ Foam


Stéphanie Solinas – Dominique Lambert / Le Pourquoi Pas?
24 February – 16 April 2017

The exhibition Dominique Lambert / Le Pourquoi Pas? presents two series by the French photographer Stéphanie Solinas. In her work, Solinas attempts to materialise abstract concepts such as identity or the spiritual in a systematic and factual manner. She employs photography as a part of a diverse array of research methods – alongside language, video and installation. The research process is central to her practice; by collaborating with experts from various disciplines Solinas investigates the shared role of the artist, the scientist and the medium as moderators of reality. Her methodical approach stands in stark contrast to the more subjective character of her subject-matter: identity, memory and the invisible world of the mind.

Foam
Keizersgracht 609
1017 DS Amsterdam

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Book Review: Lo-Life: An American Classic by George “Rack-Lo” Billips and Jackson Blount

‘Lo-Life’ is the remarkable story of a small group of teenagers fighting to make a name for themselves who eventually made themselves seen, heard, and emulated globally.

Lo-Life: An American Classic takes the reader on a trip to New York City in the early 80s—a time when crime and violence ran the streets. The infamous Lo-Life gang emerged from this tumultuous time. Formed by crews of teenagers from the Brownsville and Crown Heights neighborhoods of Brooklyn, they made a name for themselves by dressing head-to-toe in expensive Ralph Lauren clothing, or “Lo.” Polo apparel—and other preppy 80s fashion labels like Guess, Nautica, and Benetton, among others—represented an aspirational lifestyle for these kids from rough neighborhoods just struggling to get by. Fighting for style and survival, the Lo-Lifes targeted these brands, and would acquire them by any means necessary, including stick-ups, shoplifting, and hustling. A reign of terror ensued, when your new winter coat could make you the target for a robbery—or worse.

The book covers the background of what was happening culturally and socially in the greater New York area in the 1980s, and progresses until present time. There are images from published features about the members of these gangs, a ‘style-book” of sorts showing some of the most desired Lo-Life clothing, and the personal photographs and stories from some of the members of the gangs, with names like Rack-Lo, Thirstin Howl the 3rd, Uncle Disco, and Boostin’ Billy. They recount what is was like to go on boosting sprees in high-end clothing stores like Lord & Taylor, Saks 5th Avenue, John Wanamaker’s, and Trump Towers – stealing as many as possible, or the most prized pieces in the Ralph Lauren collection of clothing that defined their social status. One gang member recalls what is was like to steal a silk Crown shirt from a Lord & Taylor store,

“If you had that shirt, you were exclusive. People treated me like a celebrity, everyone wanted to take pictures with me. I didn’t even know these people, it was all because of the shirt. To other people, it was that serious.” Bek-Live

What started as an informal gang uniform organized around clean designs and bright colors, became a devotion to a lifestyle brand, and eventually created an association between the streets and luxury that would fundamentally change the fashion industry. The iconic clothing style designed by Ralph Lauren (born Ralph Lifshitz in the Bronx, NY to Jewish immigrant parents in 1939) as an expression of quality, taste, and style, an expression of the ultimate luxury living experience, was adopted by street gangs as their uniform of choice. Their desire to achieve their American Dream was presented to the world through apparel that was designed to declare: I have made it.

‘Lo-Life’ is an intriguing look inside this gang culture and its members. Although I never knew anyone personally who had been mugged or hurt for their designer clothing from that era, I heard stories of people being shot for their Air Jordans, or had their designer jacket stolen (be it Ralph Lauren, Tommy Hilfiger, Nautica, or Bennetton) – and this was in the midwest, far from the hustle and bustle of New York. ‘Lo-Life’ is ultimately the story of a life journey, a story of the American Dream, and what is was like for these young kids from New York to make a name for themselves – just like Ralph Lauren himself.

Lo-Life: An American Classic
by George “Rack-Lo” Billips and Jackson Blount 

Hardcover, 7.25 x 9.75 inches, 232 pages
ISBN: 978-1-57687-812-5

To buy a copy of Lo-Life, please visit the book’s website: http://www.powerhousebooks.com/books/lo-life-an-american-classic/ 


Jackson Blount, a Brooklyn native, graduated from SVA in 2001. He has designed professionally since, doing both corporate and freelance work throughout his design career.

Rack-Lo is one of the main catalysts of the Lo-Life movement. He played a major role in the unification of boosting crews of the early 80s to form the world-renowned Lo-Life crew. 

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