Street Shooting in Los Angeles @ dnj gallery

unnamedLos Angeles Center of Photography
First Annual LACP Student “Street Shooting in Los Angeles” Exhibition
June 27 – July 18, 2015

Opening Reception: June 27, 6 – 8 pm

dnj gallery
2525 michigan avenue, suite J1
santa monica, california 90404

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Yiannis Katsaris @ THE PROUD ARCHIVIST

Alisa
Yiannis Katsaris Inspired by “THE BEAR” Opera by W. WALTON
JULY 2015

THE PROUD ARCHIVIST
2-10 Hertford Road, London, N1 5SH

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EDITION VI: Film(ic) @ THE WAPPING PROJECT BANKSIDE

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2_g1.tif

EDITION VI: Film(ic)
2 July – 21 August 2015

a group exhibition that explores the overlaps and tensions present in the mediums of film and photography. The exhibition includes film, moving image and photography by Lillian Bassman, Elina Brotherus, Deborah Turbeville and Thomas Zanon-Larcher.

The Bishop’s Palace, Ely House
37 Dover Street London W1S 4NJ

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Keith Carter & Kate Breakey @ photo-eye Gallery

Keith Carter - Batman 2012

Keith Carter – Batman 2012

Keith Carter – Ghostland | Kate Breakey – Shadows & Light
July 10th through August 22nd, 2015

Opening and Artist Reception: Saturday July 11th 3:00–5:00 pm

photo-eye Gallery, 541 S. Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM

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Interview with photographer Mark Griffiths

The evening sun shimmers through the rugged cliff tops at Lydstep in South Pambrokeshire along the Pembrokeshire coastal path. When walking along the Pembrokeshire Coast Path National Trail you are not just walking through a geographical landscape, youÕre also taking a journey through time. The cliffs were once used as observation points for Norman invaders.

The evening sun shimmers through the rugged cliff tops at Lydstep in South Pambrokeshire along the Pembrokeshire coastal path. When walking along the Pembrokeshire Coast Path National Trail you are not just walking through a geographical landscape, youÕre also taking a journey through time. The cliffs were once used as observation points for Norman invaders.

F-Stop Magazine: How did you first become involved in photography and what led to you working in this medium as an artist?

Mark Griffiths: I began to appreciate art and photography in my early teens. I remember being mesmerized by the aesthetics and detail of images in a stack of National Geographic’s I had acquired. I would also admire the ability of the photographer to convey an accurate portrayal through the use of the medium. In my early twenties I returned from a round the world adventure and had nothing to show for my experiences apart from my own descriptions and narrations. I thought the best way to document these experiences was through photography and decided to invest in a good SLR, which is where it all started. After graduating from university with a degree in photojournalism I knew that’s all I wanted to do. I began researching potential stories and photographed everything and anything, I think a lot of graduates just expect things to happen for them once they leave university but It takes another two or three years of hard work and dedication to make it happen. It’s very rare to find an occupation that doesn’t at all feel like a chore and for me there is nothing else I could imagine myself doing.

F-Stop: The current issue of F-Stop Magazine includes images from your project “South of the Landsker”,  can you tell us about this project? How did this project come about?

MG: The project came about from an overwhelming curiosity for the area. It is unlike any other part of the country (Wales, U.K) The people are of very mixed origins and no one speaks the native dialect, Welsh. The area is also steeped in history, from ancient woodland, which remain untouched for hundreds of years to evidence of Norman invasions along the beautiful Pembrokeshire coastline. The place has a real diverse and unique feel about it. I wanted to explore the area in depth and decided to photograph people I met along the way and find out a little bit of background information to give the project some context.  I wasn’t looking for anything in particular, I wanted the project to be this loose depiction of a unique landscape with an array of diverse and interesting characters and I think that is what I got.

Clive Law moved to Pembrokeshire 20 years ago from Reading near London. He was attracted to the natural beauty of the rural landscape. Here he sits at his local village hall in Penally.

Clive Law moved to Pembrokeshire 20 years ago from Reading near London. He was attracted to the natural beauty of the rural landscape. Here he sits at his local village hall in Penally.

F-Stop: Can you discuss your process for making these images or your creative process more generally? What were you looking to capture?

MG: With any project the most important element is being knowledgeable about the work I am about to do. Researching the area and the history allowed me to choose particular regions that would represent the area best and depict an accurate narrative of what I was trying to portray. Also in regards to the subjects I photographed, I felt that spending time talking to them first and making them aware what my intentions were allowed them to relax and be comfortable in front of the lens. I think this is essential when capturing an image that is both poignant and meaningful. As a photographer you have to also be good at talking and listening. Also the camera I used a Mamiya C330 with its manual focus fully analog functions, made me really think about the elements in the frame and how these would impact the narrative overall. I would urge everyone to use film for personal and long-term projects as it makes you take a step back and consider the content of the image and essentially what you are trying to say to an audience.

F-Stop: What do you hope people see or feel or perhaps learn when they look at your photographs?

MG: I hope that when people look at these images they see the history and ruggedness of the landscape but also the vulnerability and poignancy of those photographed that live in an area without an identity. I think the work also shows that you don’t need to travel to the ends of the earth to find a story worth telling. In every village, town or city there is a story to be told, you just have to look for it.

Jenna aged 9, watches chickens feeding at the Cwnoernant farm in Carmarthenshire on the edge of the Landsker line. The Landsker line is an invisible but definite line that has been present for nearly a thousand years and divides the South West corner of Wales from the rest of the country.

Jenna aged 9, watches chickens feeding at the Cwnoernant farm in Carmarthenshire on the edge of the Landsker line. The Landsker line is an invisible but definite line that has been present for nearly a thousand years and divides the South West corner of Wales from the rest of the country.

F-Stop: Do you have a favorite image in this series? If so, which one and why is it the image that speaks to you most?

MG: The image that speaks to me the most is the one of Jenna, the young Cub Scout. When I met her she was uneasy about having her photo taken, even after talking to her to make her feel at ease. I told her to think of a significant moment in her life that was her fondest moment and it was during that thinking process that I was able to capture her. For that brief moment she was unaware of the camera and completely lost in her own world and that’s why I feel the image works best.

F-Stop: Are you working on any other projects currently?

MG: I am constantly working on new projects. The most significant however starts on June the 15th where I will be spending a month with the Chernobyl children’s charity photographing 8 children from Belarus when they spend several weeks in West Wales. The clean environment can reduce the radiation levels in their immune systems by up to 68% and can literally add years to their lives.  It will also be the first time that they will see the ocean, which I find fascinating. I think it’s a great opportunity to be able to document something so special and has the potential to make a difference to someone’s life.  I am also doing a ten-day road trip through the South West of France and a few sideline projects along throughout the summer. Watch this space!

'Gwerinwyr Gwent dancer' from the series 'The loss of tradition'

‘Gwerinwyr Gwent dancer’ from the series ‘The loss of tradition’

F-Stop: What photographers or other artists inspire you?

MG: Cinematography is always an influence, especially how each scene and setting relates to the narrative. I try to incorporate that into my own work. In terms of photographers that inspire me I would say Alec Soth, Rob Hornstra, Olivia Arthur, Larry Sultan and of course William Eggleston. Also I draw inspiration from painters for my portraiture, especially during the renaissance period, Rafael, Titan and Caravaggio are prime examples that experimented with alternative postures, gazes and lighting techniques that are a huge influence to me and many more.

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Titan. Portrait William Shakespeare

For more of Mark Griffiths work: www.markgriffithsphotography.com

 

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THE IDOL FACTORY @ GALERIE ARGENTIC

_Brenda Marshal - 1940_ Tirage argentique vintage retouché à la main, 20 x 25 cm - Pièce unique - Courtesy ARGENTIC

« THE IDOL FACTORY » Hand-retouched press photographs 1910-1970
3 APRIL – 18 JULY 2015

Galerie ARGENTIC will be exhibiting a series of hand-retouched press photographs from director Raynal Pellicer’s collection

GALERIE ARGENTIC
43 Rue Daubenton, 75005 Paris

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BACK @ Pace/MacGill

unnamedBACK
June 18 – August 28, 2015

Opening reception: June 18, 5:30 – 7:30pm

BACK, a group exhibition of photographs by Adou, Richard Benson, Harry Callahan, Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, Jim Goldberg, Emmet Gowin, Paul Graham, Hiro, Peter Hujar, Jocelyn Lee, Nicholas Nixon, Tod Papageorge, Susan Paulsen, Paolo Roversi, Lucas Samaras, Viviane Sassen, Fazal Sheikh, William Wegman, Henry Wessel, and Garry Winogrand, among others. Featuring a range of subjects – including babies, animals, and nudes – photographed solely from behind, the selected works both humorously and seriously explore the visual and psychological intrigue of images taken from this vantage point.

Pace/MacGill
32 East 57th Street, 9th Floor, New York

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Interview with photographer Tatarinova Sofya

TatarinovaSofya6

F-Stop Magazine: How did you first become involved in photography and what led to you working in this medium as an artist?

Tatarinova Sofya: I started making photography 8 years ago. I did one photograph and gave it as a present to my friend, and I notice that every time she met me she spoke about this picture and remembered it. And I think if one person in the world remembers my picture it is worth doing it. So I went to one photoschool, then another one.

F-Stop: The current issue of F-Stop Magazine includes images from your project “Udmurtya”,  can you tell us about this project? How did this project come about?

TS: I made this project near the Ural mountains of Russia in the region called Udmurtya.
I remember my first impression when I arrived there – wealthy villages and beautiful nature. I stayed at a neat house of a middle-aged lady, who lived all alone. One evening she told me the story of her husband, who hung himself after somebody stole their hay. She cried and she didn’t understand why he did it. I was deeply impressed. After it I learnt the stories of other women as well in different villages where i travelled.

I started making portraits of the widows and documenting their stories. At the same time I photographed the natural world around villages imagining it as possible places of suicide (because Udmurts are shamanists mostly hung themselves in woods), but not only that. I wanted to communicate the inseparable bond that ties the Udmurt to nature and try to find my own answer to the question: «why?». So in the series I go this way – not to show dead men, but showing what was around them and what they left after their suicide.

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F-Stop: Can you discuss your process for making these images or your creative process more generally?

TS: As an artist, I am trying to find the space between reality and imaginary in the wildlife theme. I reflect on the problem of the spectator’s vision and perception, complex relations between viewer and the picture, correlation between what the spectator sees, his notion of what he sees and the original image.

I am interested in showing the scenes that could happen in real life by means of set-up photography. It is important to make a spectator look narrowly at the image and keep his attention, to arouse his imagination and make him believe in what he sees.

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F-Stop: What were you looking to capture in the images of nature?

TS: Through it the spectator can imagine how the nature influence on Udmurts, who worship nature.

I am inclined to consider suicide as a manifestation of these powerful chthonic presence of archaic energy, which still lives in the remote Udmurtya.

I wanted to capture natural failure, a fatal failure, the hole in which other forces live, pulling the young and full of strength men inside. I am interested in atmosphere which are around this place and how it affects them.

F-Stop: What do you hope people see or feel or perhaps learn when they look at your photographs?

TS: I hope people feel this deep atmosphere or strong energy from these places which has an influence on inhabitants, especially men. At the same time I wanted them to learn these stories and see that the life goes on and the widows somehow cope with it. The widows are what these men left after their death.

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F-Stop: Do you have a favorite image in this series? If so, which one and why is it the image that speaks to you most?

TS: My favorite image from Udmurtya series is the image with bench (above). I made this photograph in the mist – for me it symbolizes the Udmurt nature and mystic atmosphere there, which affects on men.

F-Stop: What photographers or other artists inspire you?

TS: My favorite artists are Jeff Wall, Gregory Crewdson, Stephan Shore, Thomas Demand, Erwin Wurm

For more of Tatarinova Sofya’s work: www.sofiatatarinova.ru

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Space Girls Space Women @ Musée des arts et métiers

PARANAL OBSERVATORY - ESO ATACAMA DESERT, CHILE / CHILI

PARANAL OBSERVATORY – ESO
ATACAMA DESERT, CHILE / CHILI

Space Girls Space Women
18 June – 1 November 2015

This photographic investigation depicts three generations of women around the world involved in various ways in space exploration.
Many 10-18 year-old girls around the world dream of becoming astronomers, designing rockets or being the first to land on Mars. Our reporters followed some of them to space camps in the US and Turkey as well as in Biscarosse (France) during a homemade rocket launch day. A new generation of female students is getting ready for the challenges of the twenty-first century space adventure. In Toronto, Zainab, an 11 year-old schoolgirl already has her ticket to travel in space with Virgin Galactic. Young women such as Anita Vuya in Kenya, Fatoumata Kebe and Camille Dijoux in France have decided to study spatial engineering. Around the globe, women are working on European and international space programs (Herschel and Planck mission, Rosetta, International Space Station, Galileo, Ariane 5…). Whether they are astronauts, engineers, or project managers for satellites, they are on the front line of scientific research on space.

Musée des arts et métiers
60 rue Réaumur, Paris

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Miska Draskoczy @ Brooklyn Public Library

unnamed-1Miska Draskoczy: Gowanus Wild
June 11th – September 25th

Brooklyn Public Library
10 Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11238

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