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Tag Archive: Book Review

Book Review: Mean Streets:NYC 1970-1985 by Edward Grazda

The black-and-white photos in Mean Streets, collected in print for the first time, offer a look at the infamous hardscrabble New York City of the 70s and 80s, captured with the deliberate and elegant eye that propelled Grazda to further success. Grazda has photographed the world over in Mexico, Afghanistan, Pakistan and Latin America and a […]


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Book Review: Svalbard – An Arcticficial Life by Julia de Cooker

Svalbard – An Arcticficial Life by Paris-based Julia de Cooker, born 1988, a French/Dutch photographer, educated at ECAL, the School of Art and Design in Lausanne, Switzerland, portrays an archipelago in the very north of mainland Europe. According to Wikipedia, Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, about midway between continental Norway and the […]


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Book review: Return to Fukushima by Rebecca Bathory

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was directly impacted by an earthquake on the 3rd of March, 2011. Tsunami waves breeched the perimeter of the power facility, and the resulting flood waters caused the plant to shut down. Overheated reactors exploded, radioactivity was released via the air and in water that washed into the sea. […]


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Book review: Impossible is Nothing: China’s Theater of Consumerism by Priscilla Briggs

Over a span of six years, American photographer Priscilla Briggs traveled along the eastern seaboard of China to explore various facets of Chinese society within the context of a new brand of Communism that embraces “Capitalism with Chinese characteristics.” The fascinating resulting work is published in Briggs’ first monograph, Impossible is Nothing: China’s Theater of […]


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Book Review: Generation Wealth by Lauren Greenfield

Generation Wealth by Lauren Greenfield is both a retrospective and an investigation into the subject of wealth over the last twenty-five years. Greenfield has traveled the world – from Los Angeles to Moscow, Dubai to China – bearing witness to the global boom-and-bust economy and documenting its complicated consequences. Provoking serious reflection, this book is not […]


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Book Review: The Human Cost of Agrotoxins by Pablo E. Piovano

This tome documents the catastrophic consequences of inconsiderate use of agrotoxins by Monsanto in the Northeast of Argentina over twenty years, mainly congenital malformations. But there are also other kinds of sufferings that are not readily visible: miscarriages and cancer, as photojournalist Pablo E. Piovano, born 1981, states. Unsurprisingly, most media rarely write about it. […]


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Book Review: What is Left Behind: Stories from Estate Sales by Norm Diamond

What Is Left Behind features photographs of items at estate sales that explore themes of memory, mortality, and cultural history. Estate sales have become a common way for people to dispose of their parents’ possessions after they die or move to assisted living. Over the course of a year, Norm Diamond visited countless estate sales, photographing objects that evoke […]


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Book Review: The Best of LensCulture Vol. 1

“How to discover the best practitioners worldwide amidst our image-filled cultures of the 21st century?”, Jim Casper, the Editor-in-Chief of LensCulture, asks in his introduction. “Our editorial team scours the globe – attending festivals, portfolio reviews, exhibitions and graduation shows – in search of new and developing talents. And each year, we organize four annual […]


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Book Review: One Second of Light by Giles Duley

Portraits of Shared Humanity: Giles Duley photographs the survivors of war Wars come and go, but their legacies remain. Photographer Giles Duley’s focus goes beyond war itself. Throughout his career, Duley has documented the effects of war — instability, displacement, trauma, in-fighting, refugees and casualties. Regardless the region, conflict brings the same core damage … and it is people […]


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Book Review: Destino Final by Giancarlo Ceraudo

From 1976 until 1983 Argentina was held hostage by a military dictatorship. Approximately 5,000 opponents of the brutal regime were put on planes and thrown into the sea. “They were unconscious: we undressed them and when the captain of the flight gave us the order we opened the door and threw them out, naked, on […]


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