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Type Archive: Book Review

Reaching for Dawn by Elliott Verdier

Liberia’s population generally does not speak of the bloody civil war which took place from 1989-2003. No proper memorial has been built, no day is dedicated to the commemoration of the brutal conflict. The country largely refuses to officially condemn its perpetrators, which hinders the collective healing process, and possibility of social recognition of the
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Book Review: Conversations with Dad by Carissa Dorson

The story of a daughter and her father building a closer relationship through their shared passion for photography  I’m personally at a time in my life when my oldest child, Alison, is graduating college this month –  and I can’t help but wax nostalgic. Conversations With Dad by Carissa Dorson is the salve for the
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Book Review: Sleeping Beauty by Lydia Panas

The first line of the press release for Sleeping Beauty by Lydia Panas states: “Portraits of women and girls intertwined with the photographer’s gaze, in a rare subversion of photography’s power relations.” Panas is no stranger to subverting the power relationship (of photography’s male dominated history, we presume) as her work in The Mark of Abel,
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Cover of the book I Saw the Air Fly

BOOK REVIEW: I Saw The Air Fly by Sirkhane Darkroom

Mardin is a city in southeastern Turkey, capital of the province of the same name. The Syrian territory opens up to the south of the province of Mardin. Its population is very heterogeneous and includes Arabs, Assyrians and Kurds. But above all refugees from the nearby war zones of Armenia, Iraq and, last in order
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Book Review: Motor City Underground: Leni Sinclair Photographs 1963-1978

Leni Sinclair often refers to herself as a ‘participant-observer’, a label commonly used to describe someone documenting observations, or doing research while they actively work within the group being studied. Sinclair’s story and her iconic images are a unique journey, but also one shared with her fellow radicals, artists, progressives and freedom fighters of the
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Book Review: Our Strange New Land by Alex Harris

Images that part a curtain and invite us to see ourselves   The High Museum in Atlanta commissioned Alex Harris as part of its Picturing the South series. While the brief was to photograph anything in the American South, Harris chose to examine the rapidly evolving world of independent fiction filmmaking while also exploring our
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Book review: Pretty Much by Sandy Carson

Sandy Carson’s latest book, Pretty Much, is a humorous look at where he found himself in 2020 his adopted hometown of Austin, Texas. Carson’s photographic viewpoint is a sympathetic and curious exploration of his surroundings. His images address such weighty topics and social issues like racial injustice, housing insecurity, financial security, grief, and family life.
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Black Diamonds book cover

Book Review: Black Diamonds by Rich-Joseph Facun

Black Diamonds has been on my mind ever since opening the pages, viewing the photos, and reading the heartfelt and sanguine words from Rich-Joseph Facun, and the essay by Alison Stine. The images are penetratingly beautiful. It’s powerful stuff. It touched me.  Black Diamonds is a personal project, and as a person of color, Facun has
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Steel Town Book Cover

BOOK REVIEW: Steel Town by Stephen Shore

Stephen Shore is considered one of the most significant photographers of our time. Having approached photography at the age of only six, then influenced by the work of Walker Evans, he managed to attract attention to himself at the age of fourteen, when his work was purchased by Edward Steichen for the collection of the
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Book Review: Finding Home by Becky Field

Photographer Becky Field photographed and interviewed many of New Hampshire’s immigrants and refugees.  She interviewed forty people, from different countries, with different stories. Some are men, some women, they differ in age and why they left their home countries, and how come they settled in New Hampshire. “The photographs were usually taken in a home
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