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Type Archive: Landscapes

BOOK REVIEW: Vals by Nejma Kachaou

First things first: I like the pictures in this work. They are compositions of shapes and colours. As far as I’m concerned, they could have been taken anywhere … but weren’t. There is no information about the photographer to be found in this book and only a rather brief introduction by Laureline Mattiussi (in French,
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Book Review: American Geography: Photographs of Land Use from 1840 to the Present

  The 345 photographs in American Geography (divided by regions) address ways in which different histories and traditions of land use have given rise to different cultural transitions, such as the growth of industry in the Northeast, agricultural developments in the Midwest, the legacies of slavery on the economies of the South, and the mining
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Interview with photographer Amanda Musick

  Amanda Musick’s Land Unfolding work is highlighted as F-Stop Magazine’s featured artist in the Landscape issue of Oct/Nov 2021. Her work examines the natural environment and the ways in which a photograph can function to represent place. Musick departs from historically traditional representation of landforms and scenes; both real or imagined. She explores this dichotomy
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Mulholland-COVER

BOOK REVIEW: Mulholland by Karen Halverson

For reasons I’m not really sure of, Mulholland triggers feelings of longing in me. I guess it’s to do with the Raymond Chandler mysteries that I read in my youth and that I associate with this winding stretch of road that follows the ridgeline of the Hollywood Hills. “I fell in love with Mulholland Drive
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Book Review: Night on Earth by Art Wolfe

“Every night, an unseen buzz of activity takes place all around the globe,” I read on the blurb of this formidable work. This reminds me of a talk given 14 years ago in Southern California by a biologist who informed the listeners about the dangers of artificial light during nighttime. I specifically remember being stunned
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Book Review: Old Is New by Hiroshi Sugimoto and Tomoyuki Sakakida

The firm New Material Research Laboratory (NMRL) was founded in 2008 by Hiroshi Sugimoto (born 1948) and Tomoyuki Sakakida (born 1976) and is guided by the idea that “The oldest things are the newest.” Since I’m at a loss what this exactly means, I turn to the press release that informs me that “Sugimoto and
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Book Review: Sea Level by Mandy Williams

Sea Level is a series of images made in Worthing, England w­here Mandy Williams lived as a teenager. Making images in familiar places is prominent in her work, and the diaristic nature of the project is both a comment on the sense of place she experiences, as well as the overlaid ideas of the appreciation,
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Book Review: The Plain by Melanie Friend

I do not find these photographs especially well-crafted, do not deem the framing very appealing but, nevertheless, I feel drawn to them because wide open spaces attract me. In other words, I do not think you can do much wrong when photographing open landscapes. Such was my take after a first and rather casual look
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Book Review: Crown Ditch & The Prairie Castle by Kyler Zeleny

“Some use empty or banal to describe the prairies, I use the term sublimely banal. The writer and prairie son Wallace Stegner once called the emptiness of space on the prairies “almost frighteningly total.” The place I grew up could be argued to be the last ‘proving ground’ of colonial settlement, as such, it is
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Book Review: Grönland by Ulrike Crespo

Grönland (Greenland) is a tome in German and English by Ulrike Crespo (1950-2019) whose background in art history, archaeology and psychology seems to have influenced her photographic work. To me at least, the cover and pic number 6, for instance, look as fascinatingly indecipherable as our unconscious. What attracted me first and foremost to this
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